Gunnery SGT. Jack Coughlin, USMC

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  1. #1 Gunnery SGT. Jack Coughlin, USMC 
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    I was wondering if anyone has heard or knows him. I read his book "Shooter" its a pretty good book because he talks about his time in Somalia and when while he was in Iraq for "Operation Iraqi Freedom". He was on of the top-ranked Marine Snipers during the Iraq War. He talks about his encounters with enemie forces and his different stageties on making a perfect "One Shot, One kill". He has more than Sixty confirmed kills with little shots that missed a target, while in the war, he held the best shots to kills ratio for a sniper. This is deffinently (sp?) a book that i would recommend you read if you are in the Military or love to read war books.

    One certain part of the book cought my attention. He described a situation in Somalia where he was using the famous
    "M82A1A Special Application Scoped Riffle (SASR), which is a .50 caliber beast of a weapon that weighs more than twenty-eight punds and fires an armor piercing incendiary tracer bullet that can punch a big hole through a sheet of steel, and even bigger hole through flimsy flesh-from Shooter".
    He used this awsome weapon to take out a ZSU-23/4's(anti-aircraft) ammo feeding tray. He did and also killed a "skinny" in the process because it went through the tray and struck the gunner. He later used the M82 to take out a gunman wielding an AK-47 from a window.

    My question is: From my knowledge about the Geneva Convention, i thought it was moraly wrong to shoot some one with this massive high caliber gun? This question wil most likely be answered by TheEyesOfTexas becasue of his military background. Just thought i would share this with you. Thanks.
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  2. #2  
    xa
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    No. I searched through the Geneva convention for the words caliber(none found at cali), weapon(one found, related to use on POWs), and biological(to find lists of unuseable weapons). I could not find anything about this in the original convention.
    http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/91.htm
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    Well, Xa is wrong as per usual. Next time you "research" something, try not to do a half assed job of it.

    The article you want is Protocol on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Incendiary Weapons (Protocol III). Geneva, 10 October 1980.

    The M82 uses incendiary rounds and is prohibited to use against humans as a direct target.
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    Carlos Hathcock (Long Traang), USMC sniper during the Vietnam war, had 93 comfirmed kills. I would say he is better than your Jack Coughlin. Not only did he work with less advanced sniper rifles, but he also worked in jungle and tall grass terrain.



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    Ah, good to see mob knows his snipers :D Carlos is, by far, the best sniper ever. There is no doubt about it. If you read the book "Marine Sniper: 93 Confirmed Kills" you will definately fall in love with the art of sniping. It's just to sad the way he ended his career :(
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    Teknic the flaming mod:
    Thanks for flaming me Teknic, I really enjoy being insulted by some one who is supposed to stop insults. You're mildly lucky there isn't any customer satisfaction box for mods.

    As for that I searched the page completely and found no links to other parts. I assumed that was it.

    Pronz
    Ummm, for those of us who don't plan to order the book/buy it at a store how did he die?

    mOBSCENE or pronz: what was his hit/miss ratio?
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    pm any mod or admin for complaints about anything, whether its mods or anything to do with the site.

    And so ends the dynasty that once was Socom-2.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by The mOBSCENE
    Carlos Hathcock (Long Traang), USMC sniper during the Vietnam war, had 93 comfirmed kills. I would say he is better than your Jack Coughlin. Not only did he work with less advanced sniper rifles, but he also worked in jungle and tall grass terrain.
    THATS A NO BRAINER. maybe i should have rewrote my sentence. to say that he was one of the best during the Iraq war, and he had the best record DURING the Iraq war. Why do i always make these damn mistakes. why me?
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    As usual, the Master Chief is correct. Incendiary rounds are illegal to use against enemy personnel. However, they can be used against enemy equipment. The feeding tray is considered enemy equipment and the fact that a skinny was killed takes no precedence. The fact that he fired upon a person... is slightly bending the rules. However, in Scout/Sniper School, snipers are well versed on the the Geneva Convention and they get around the incendiary rounds problem by saying that the sniper is firing on the equipment the enemy is wearing (Which can be BDU's, grenades, tactical gear, etc.) We are very liberal in our definition of the Geneva Convention.

    Mob, using your words... it is easier to snipe from jungle and tall grass areas than flat desert for the obvious reason, you can conceal yourself against grass... where are you going to hide in the desert of in an Urban Environment? Not in the grass, thats for damn sure. Now obviously Gunny Hathcock is still the man, but Gunny Coughlin is getting up there.

    To answer xa, Gunny Hathcock died after a battle with Multiple Sclerosis. What is sad is that he was medically discharged from the Marine Corps just 55 days short of the 20 years required to collect a full pension. His fighting/sniping career was ended in Vietnam after he was burnt (almost beyond recognition) after an Amtrack he was riding on top of ran over a mine and he was sprayed with gasoline. He saved the lives of 7 Marines because he went back into the Amtrack and made sure that they were all clear all the while he was on fire and exploding ammunition was going off, he was issued the Silver Star (37 years after the accident, he was issued the medal after being denied the Medal of Honor).

    I don't think that there are any accurate hit/miss ratio numbers available for Gunny Hathcock, but if I had to ballpark it... I will put them at around 95% of all sniper rounds fired by Gunny Hathcock were hits on his intended target.
    -----------------------
    And XA, don't complain about the Chief's comments. You were wrong and you just need to keep your mouth shut and apologize for being incorrect. He is right, you have been wrong about A LOT of things so just take it easy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by EyesofTexas
    As usual, the Master Chief is correct. Incendiary rounds are illegal to use against enemy personnel. However, they can be used against enemy equipment. The feeding tray is considered enemy equipment and the fact that a skinny was killed takes no precedence. The fact that he fired upon a person... is slightly bending the rules. However, in Scout/Sniper School, snipers are well versed on the the Geneva Convention and they get around the incendiary rounds problem by saying that the sniper is firing on the equipment the enemy is wearing (Which can be BDU's, grenades, tactical gear, etc.) We are very liberal in our definition of the Geneva Convention.

    Mob, using your words... it is easier to snipe from jungle and tall grass areas than flat desert for the obvious reason, you can conceal yourself against grass... where are you going to hide in the desert of in an Urban Environment? Not in the grass, thats for damn sure. Now obviously Gunny Hathcock is still the man, but Gunny Coughlin is getting up there.

    To answer xa, Gunny Hathcock died after a battle with Multiple Sclerosis. What is sad is that he was medically discharged from the Marine Corps just 55 days short of the 20 years required to collect a full pension. His fighting/sniping career was ended in Vietnam after he was burnt (almost beyond recognition) after an Amtrack he was riding on top of ran over a mine and he was sprayed with gasoline. He saved the lives of 7 Marines because he went back into the Amtrack and made sure that they were all clear all the while he was on fire and exploding ammunition was going off, he was issued the Silver Star (37 years after the accident, he was issued the medal after being denied the Medal of Honor).

    I don't think that there are any accurate hit/miss ratio numbers available for Gunny Hathcock, but if I had to ballpark it... I will put them at around 95% of all sniper rounds fired by Gunny Hathcock were hits on his intended target.
    -----------------------
    And XA, don't complain about the Chief's comments. You were wrong and you just need to keep your mouth shut and apologize for being incorrect. He is right, you have been wrong about A LOT of things so just take it easy.
    You and LuFeng never cease to amaze me. The trait that distiguished Coughlin from other snipers is he rode ontop of a Humvee; this was only because there was no more room in the humvee. he also sniped from atop of the humvee during one of the small town raides, if i remember he shot and killed 3 people from that postion. There was this one time were he shot a teenager who was weilding an AK-47, not once, but twice!. the kid mangaed to servived because one round went through his shoulder while the second went through his back and exited a few inches from any major organ. No idea how he lived, but he was a lucky sum bich.

    Reading books like this and watching the Sniper movies is what drives me to do the best i can to become a good Marine and hopfully qualify for the Scout/Sniper school down in Hawaii.
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  11. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by EyesofTexas
    Mob, using your words... it is easier to snipe from jungle and tall grass areas than flat desert for the obvious reason, you can conceal yourself against grass... where are you going to hide in the desert of in an Urban Environment? Not in the grass, thats for damn sure. Now obviously Gunny Hathcock is still the man, but Gunny Coughlin is getting up there.
    I would say that it is easier to snipe from desert terrain then jungle terrain. Sure, in desert terrain you could be spotted easier but you do not have the obstruction of trees and tall grass in your line of fire or your sight partially obscured.



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    Quote Originally Posted by The mOBSCENE
    Carlos Hathcock (Long Traang), USMC sniper during the Vietnam war, had 93 comfirmed kills. I would say he is better than your Jack Coughlin. Not only did he work with less advanced sniper rifles, but he also worked in jungle and tall grass terrain.
    Not meaning to change the subject, but isn't he the gent that was also famous for sniping a sniper with a clean shot going through the scope, while this guy was apparently trying to track and snipe him? (hope that makes sense lol.)
    Remember watching a two part series on The History Channel about snipers and a good 45 mins was dedicated to the gent that did this...stuck out in my mind because according to how it went down, he was aware that this guy was after him and let him follow him for several days. One late afternoon he set up, saw the glint of a scope, and fired his shot on it where it apparently went through the opposing snipers scope scoring a headshot. The guy did alot of other stuff in service of our country but this paticular story sticks out in my head...and I can't remember the gent's name :(. Curious if this is him? Was a good show too btw, it's truely amazing as to what some snipers have to do and endure to even get in position to take a shot.
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    In my experience with sniping is limited to the 2 day course on sniping at Force Recon. School. Since most of our training involved AO specific training, we worked a lot of desert areas in our training and when we went to train in woodland-type areas... I found it easier in the woodland areas because you generally have enough elevation and foliage to cover your movement and fire an accurate shot. In the desert, there are minimal obstructions (unless you are in a MOUT environment) but you usually don't have a lot of elevation and wind up firing up at people since you need to be prone and covered. But it is usually a preference thing.

    Sniping from the top of a Humvee is no simple task, especially when we started chop shopping the armor around the .50cal turret. Most designated marksmen are trained to fire from buildings, above, over and on vehicles, and even from sewer systems. Since DM's are generally used in an urban environment, we need to be able to fire from what we have available. The Gunny has nothing but my respect because I know that firing from on top of a Humvee is like trying to snipe while riding a bucking bronco. And USMC, it actually isn't hard to believe that more than 1 round is needed to drop the enemy so I will give you a brief history lesson.

    When the Army/USMC had the 7.62 ammunition that was originally used in the early M16 and M14. These rounds will drop a man in 1 shot. When we switched to the 5.56 ammo, especially those that are armor piercing... they go straight through the body causing minimal damage to internal organs. So it often takes a lot of shots. That is the main reason my weapon of choice when backing up my M16A4 is the M14DMR (M21) sniper rifle. It is an M14 with a scope, bipod and reinforced buttstock. It uses the 7.62 ammo and although it is semi-auto, one round drops them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by The mOBSCENE
    Carlos Hathcock (Long Traang), USMC sniper during the Vietnam war, had 93 comfirmed kills. I would say he is better than your Jack Coughlin. Not only did he work with less advanced sniper rifles, but he also worked in jungle and tall grass terrain.
    My dad told me about that guy. I was amazed lol.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGuyWithaGun
    Quote Originally Posted by The mOBSCENE
    Carlos Hathcock (Long Traang), USMC sniper during the Vietnam war, had 93 comfirmed kills. I would say he is better than your Jack Coughlin. Not only did he work with less advanced sniper rifles, but he also worked in jungle and tall grass terrain.
    Not meaning to change the subject, but isn't he the gent that was also famous for sniping a sniper with a clean shot going through the scope, while this guy was apparently trying to track and snipe him? (hope that makes sense lol.)
    Remember watching a two part series on The History Channel about snipers and a good 45 mins was dedicated to the gent that did this...stuck out in my mind because according to how it went down, he was aware that this guy was after him and let him follow him for several days. One late afternoon he set up, saw the glint of a scope, and fired his shot on it where it apparently went through the opposing snipers scope scoring a headshot. The guy did alot of other stuff in service of our country but this paticular story sticks out in my head...and I can't remember the gent's name :(. Curious if this is him? Was a good show too btw, it's truely amazing as to what some snipers have to do and endure to even get in position to take a shot.
    That part was in the 1st sniper movie, with TomBerenger. not saying this didnt really happen in real life, but that was a part in the movie, he used a smartass NSA for bait and then he dropped his knife in the water to make the unwary sniper look at him, when he did he put one in the scope and into this head.
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Gunnery SGT. Jack Coughlin, USMC